Welcome to My Project Delight

welcome to MPDI became a project manager by accident. Many years ago, the only opening at an organisation I wanted to work for was mysteriously called ‘project manager’. I applied, successfully passed the competition and they offered me the job. I hardly realised back then what the job is about and what to expect. I was all smiles on my first day. The organisation did its best, but it was also going through change management. I continued to put on a brave face. Very soon an avalanche of a multi million Euro projects portfolio, I was supposed to “manage”, challenged my smile with a smirk: “Let’s see your talents now”. Needless to say that as soon as my previous employer got back to me, I returned to the job I felt comfortable at.

In time, project management became a professional delight and I always cherishes my first experience. I wish back then I had a mentor or coach, or resources, which would explain the tips and tricks of the trade.  This blog is inspired by my younger self and the every day learner I am aspiring to be. Myprojectdelight.com is my Giving Pledge.

I manage projects mainly in the development management environment, which fosters numerous transferable skills and competences for both private and public sectors.

Generosity and knowledge sharing are my values. I offer tips whenever I can. “Tips are like hugs, without the awkward body contact” I once read next to a tips box in a cafe in an airport. So are the tips on this blog.

Enjoy it, thrive and share it around you!

Thank you, 2020!

As we processed the last payments for services delivered in 2020, we were grateful for having created opportunities for others. Thanks to these, they managed to stay afloat. And even thrive perhaps a little.

We learned to read each other on the screen. We compensated the missing clues by asking more frequently: “What do you mean?”

We got frustrated by the 10th email on something we could have solved in 3 minutes by walking into each others’ offices. And we picked up the phone to air it.

We acknowledged that while many of the processes this year were global, the way we felt their effects is individual and highly personal.

We learned the art of planning to re-plan and plan again.

We loved the “mute all” button. And “camera off”, which let us stroll unwatched to the kitchen for yet another bite of cookie.

We felt like naughty grandchildren shouting into grand-dad’s ear: “Can you hear me?”, still grateful for all the technology we have to connect.

We learned some things about our neighbors’ routine and know now not to accept video-calls during certain hours while teleworking.

We managed our time-in-the-office and teleworking and learned by heart the schedule of our partners and team members spread across the continent. Only to learn that it changed again.

We dropped the “all-or-nothing” approach. We allowed for complexity and different shades or nuances. We sought what was possible to do and went for it.

As externalities of travel and sanitary restrictions kept proliferating, we stopped should-ing on yourself and team members. We replaced the constriction of “should,” “ought to,” and “must” with “can,” “choose to” or “decide to”.

We thanked each other more and reinforced the gratitude at work.

We will keep at least some of these in mind as we enter a New Year. We will continue to learn, as we’ll navigate the course, that life is change and change makes life, in projects and beyond.